The conference paper accepted for publication in PerDis 2017

The paper “Public displays for public participation in urban settings: a survey” (Authors: Guiying DuAuriol Degbelo, Christian Kray) has been accepted for publication in the 6th ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays.

Abstract: Public displays can be used to support public participation in urban settings. This article provides a survey of the use of public displays for public participation in an urban con- text, covering articles on this topic published between 2012 and 2016. 36 papers were selected and analyzed along eight dimensions: type of political context, type of scientific contribution, standalone displays vs displays with a device, single vs multi-purpose displays, shape of displays, lab vs field study, deployment in public vs semi-public space, and the level of public participation addressed. Our analysis revealed a number of trends regarding public displays and public participation in urban settings. Inspecting these articles also led to the observation that current research on public displays is mainly targeting lower levels of public participation and that the evaluation of public displays for public participation in urban setting remains a challenge.

Paper accepted for publication in JeDeM.

The paper  “Designing Semantic APIs for Open Government Data” (Authors: Auriol Degbelo, Sergio Trilles, Christian Kray, Devanjan
Bhattacharya
, Nicholas Schiestel, Jonas Wissing and Carlos Granell) has been accepted for publication in the eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government.

Abstract: Many countries currently maintain a national data catalog, which provides access to the available datasets – sometimes via an Application Programming Interface (API). These APIs play a crucial role in realizing the benefits of open data as they are the means by which data is discovered and accessed by applications that make use of it. This article proposes semantic APIs as a way of improving access to open data. A semantic API helps to retrieve datasets according to their type (e.g., sensor, climate, finance), and facilitates reasoning about and learning from data. The article examines categories of open datasets from 40 European open data catalogs to gather some insights into types of datasets which should be considered while building semantic APIs for open government data. The results show that the probability of inter-country agreement between open data catalogs is less than 30 percent, and that few categories stand out as candidates for a transnational semantic API. They stress the need for coordination – at the local, regional, and national level – between data providers of Germany, France, Spain, and the United Kingdom.